“Star Trek: DS9” & International Development

To celebrate the 50th anniversary of Star TrekPopMatters is running a series of articles about the franchise. I wrote a piece about Deep Space Nine and the politics of international development. I argue that the show takes a surprisingly nuanced approach to foreign aid. Some of what I discuss is based on my experience working for democratization projects in Southeast Asia. Check it out here!

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“The Telling” by Ursula K. Le Guin

leguincoverartOver the next few weeks, Mythgard is running a free online course on Ursula Le Guin’s The Dispossessed. I’m rereading Le Guin’s Hainish books in order to prepare. The Telling is the most recent book in the series, published in 2000.

In some ways, The Telling is a synthesis of Le Guin’s previous Hainish novels. It combines the political skepticism of The Dispossessed, the anti-imperialism of The Word for World is Forest, and the intimacy of The Left Hand of Darkness. Yet, Le Guin never simply rehashes previous work. The Telling has its own identity as an exploration of how cultures survive government attempts to homogenize them. Continue reading ““The Telling” by Ursula K. Le Guin”

“The Word for World is Forest” by Ursula K. Le Guin

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Over the next few weeks, Mythgard is running a free online course on Ursula Le Guin’s The Dispossessed. I’m rereading Le Guin’s Hainish books in order to prepare. 

The Word for World is Forest continues Ursula K. Le Guin’s exploration of injustice. This time, she focuses on cultural and environmental destruction. In the distant future, humans colonize the planet Athshe for its timber resources. Le Guin alternates between Davidson, a human military officer, and Selver, an Athshean native whose wife Davidson had raped and killed. This isn’t one of Le Guin’s subtler novels, but it is a well written parable about the dangers of first contact.

Continue reading ““The Word for World is Forest” by Ursula K. Le Guin”

“The Dispossessed” by Ursula K. Le Guin

Over the next few weeks, Mythgard is running a free online course on Ursula Le Guin’s The Dispossessed. I’m rereading Le Guin’s Hainish books in order to prepare. 

On its surface, The Dispossessed is a story about a physicist, Shevek, who struggles to conduct his research in the face of political and social opposition. Shevek flees his homeworld, Anarres, for the neighboring moon Urras. However, The Dispossessed is really Ursula K. Le Guin’s way of exploring the limits of “utopia.” Anarres society practices a non-Leninist form of communism, whereas Urras permits a thriving if unequal capitalist economy. Shevek finds that he cannot adjust to either society. Continue reading ““The Dispossessed” by Ursula K. Le Guin”